Rudder, Propeller & Shafts

We decided to remove the rudder, dismantle the propeller and pull the prop shaft in order to undertake a thorough inspection. The stern tube was pressure tested and found to be leaking so it too was removed.

Rudder just out of the water
Rudder just out of the water

The propeller components were cleaned and polished. A new a new pitch control shaft manufactured to ensure the pitch control mechanism works correctly.

Removing the variable pitch propeller
Removing the variable pitch propeller

The main shaft was found to be worn and the stern tube badly eroded by electrolysis. The bearings were worn down to nothing and the propeller shaft was not being lubricated in the stern tube.
The mounting on the aft end was badly corroded and one of the main bolt holes was broken away. Continue reading “Rudder, Propeller & Shafts”

Masts & Rigging

Upon close inspection after arrival in Hobart the rigging was found to be in generally poor condition.

The main is a tapered steep tube over the top of a 6 meter wooden plug which extends through to the stem.  While the main has a few rust patches and a small hole near the main spreaders it is in generally good condition. The mizzen is a wooden mast and is also in good condition.

Rigger, Anastasia Konstantinidis suggested removing the main mast so that it could be repaired where necessary, sanded and repainted then dressed with new rigging and reinstalled.

Top of main mast showing original rigging. Feb 2014
Top of main mast showing original rigging. Feb 2014

Unfortunately funds were not available so the rig was replaced with the masts standing. With hindsight removal may well have been the cheaper option.
All the wire rope, bottle screws and shackles were replaced with Australian standard, load rated equipment.

Continue reading “Masts & Rigging”

Hull – before

The boat was slipped for the first time in January 2014 at the Hobart slipway. An initial inspection revealed little damage and confirmed that generally the hull was in good condition. Some caulking was replaced and the anti foul replaced.

First slipping Jan 2014
First slipping Jan 2014

The second slipping occurred in Devonport in February 2016.The intention of this slipping was to give the hull and the drive chain a thorough inspection and overhaul. After haul-out the hull was cleaned and then sand blasted back to bare wood to remove all coatings.

Port side prior to work commencing
Port side prior to work commencing

A thorough inspection by shipwright Rudi Dahms showed several planks with Teredo worm damage. A large random selection of fastenings were removed from all sections of the hull and inspected for integrity. We found the percentage of damaged or corroded fastenings, particularly towards the stern to be unacceptable so decided to install over 2,500 new fastenings to ensure hull integrity.

Inspecting hull just out of the water
Inspecting hull just out of the water

The majority of the planking was in good condition and with proper maintenance should last for many years. There were some small areas in the stern which will need to be investigated further at our next slipping in 12 – 15 months time.

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The Isuzu 60 kVA Generator

When the vessel was first purchase there were two generators on board. A 15 kVA Vetus and a 60 kVA Isuzu. The Vetus was removed when the solar was installed.

Gen. set in original condition
Gen. set in original condition

The fuel supply system to the Isuzu was replaced as described in the section on Fuel tanks and systems.
The fuel system including fuel pump and injectors was removed and completely reconditioned.
A new anode was placed in the engine cooling system and the on-board salt water cooling pump replaced with a a new unit.

Prior to fuel system refurbishment
Prior to fuel system refurbishment

The Isuzu exhaust system was rebuilt in copper pipe and new exhaust hose and then plumbed directly overboard via a water trap. The motor was cleaned -degreased and repainted.

New engine room main propulsion and generator instrument panel.
New engine room main propulsion and generator instrument panel.

A new engine instrument panel was installed in the engine room to monitor the generator performance. Motor and generator operation was adjusted to ensure correct RPM and voltage generation

Freshly cleaned and painted
Freshly cleaned and painted

 

 

 

 

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The Gardner 8L3B

The Gardner was found to be in good general condition. All eight injectors were replaced with new ones and several spares were sourced as well. The cooling system and heat exchanger were opened up and inspected and reinstalled. No issues were found. Anodes were replaced in the heat exchanger.

Our 8L3B
Our 8L3B

A new Morse Cable throttle and gear selection control system was installed to replace the original wire and chain system. The Morse cables run from the newly refurbished lever controls in the wheel house to the engine room.

Original cable throttle controls
Original cable throttle controls

The control lever in the wheel house were stripped down and new internal parts installed. All parts were supplied by Gardner in the UK.

New morse cable throttle controls
New morse cable throttle controls

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading “The Gardner 8L3B”

Fuel Tanks & Fuel Systems

When purchased the vessel had 4 X 2,500 litre steel fuel tanks. Only the stern port side tank was usable for fuel. The forward starboard side tank was used as a fresh water tank.

Rust inside original fuel tank No 2
Rust inside original fuel tank No 2

The other two tanks were so badly rusted that they were no longer serviceable. All four tanks were removed after closer inspection revealed that there was significant rust damage to the tops of all four tanks.

Rust in the bottom of tank No 1 which was being used for fresh water.
Rust in the bottom of tank No 1 which was being used for fresh water.

Two new fully baffled and triple layered ‘flexible’ bladder tanks were specially designed and made to replace the steel tanks.
Two highly structurally designed bays were constructed using heavy gauge steel and  structural deck mesh. Steel uprights were bolted to the main ribs of the boat then a slightly sloping floors was constructed and installed. A heavy duty steel top frame was then attached and then the bays were bolted back to the main ship timbers using steel braces. Continue reading “Fuel Tanks & Fuel Systems”

Focsal

The original focsal space comprised 3 separate rooms. A main crew bunk room with 4 bunks, another bunk room with 2 bunks and a bathroom and toilet. Unfortunately there are no photos of the original focsal areas.

All the internal walls were removed to make one large space. The bathroom was converted to a laundry containing a washer and tumble dryer. At sea the washing machine pumps its water directly over board but in sensitive areas it can be diverted to the forward grey water holding tank. Continue reading “Focsal”

Engine Room

The engine room, like a lot of this boat was in a relatively low state of repair. Maintenance was clearly not regularly undertaken and many parts of the room were in a very sad state.

Original port side overboard before refurbishment.
Original port side overboard before refurbishment.

As well as all the new work on the bilges and fuel tanks (see there own sections) all the overboard pipes in the engine room have been removed and only those required have been retained. All holes to the outside have been plugged and covered.

One of the many original sea cocks
One of the many original sea cocks

One new 3″ salt water manifold was installed to supply sea water to the Gardener, the Isuzu generator, the water maker and the toilet system. Each engine has its own strainer basket and take-off. The inlet on the underside of the hull was covered with a new stainless steel strainer.
The new manifold is fitted with removable anodes and has been properly grounded to the boats ‘earth’.

New salt water inlet manifold with strainers for each take-off. Connected to the only salt water sea cock.
New salt water inlet manifold with strainers for each take-off. Connected to the only salt water sea cock.

Continue reading “Engine Room”

Electrical Systems

The wiring on the boat, particularly the engine room and wheel house was ‘a joke’.  Literally dozens of redundant connections, gauges, pumps & systems, exposed, loose & terminated wires, nothing properly marked and poorly functioning fuses & circuit breakers.

Original 240 V switchboard with covers off
Original 240 V switchboard with covers off

All engine room wiring was exposed then traced and all terminated and redundant wiring removed. The main 240V and 24V switchboards were opened and all redundant circuits removed. The 12V system was removed completely. New 240V circuit breakers were installed in the 240V board for the remaining useful circuits. New RCDs were also installed. Massive amounts of wire was removed.

240 V AC switchboard after removal of redundant circuits
240 V AC switchboard after removal of redundant circuits

Due to the installation of solar the current huge switchboard is redundant and will be removed over time. All wiring from both the 240V side and the 24V side will be replaced with new wire as time allows.

Redundant wiring removed from the engine room and main switchboards.
Redundant wiring removed from the engine room and main switchboards.

During the reconstruction of the saloon main walls new 240V and 24V cabling was installed to replace all the old and redundant wiring located in these walls. Extra circuits were installed for future use. All circuits were connected to the existing switchboard. New circuits were also run to the bar and guest toilet areas.

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Chain Plates

The forward chain plates were generally in good condition although coated in rust. Chain Plates00009

The rear chain plates were also extremely rusty but were attached to the topside through rotten timbers. Structurally all six rear chain plates were unsound and had to be removed and the supporting timbers replaced.

The forward chain plates were all sand blasted back to bear metal and then 2 coats of Jotamastic 90 epoxy undercoat applied. They were then painted with a two pack epoxy black enamel. All the rear chain plates were completely removed from the vessel.

Original chain plate set-up Feb 2016
Original chain plate set-up Feb 201

The woodwork under the rear chain plates was replaced with hardwood bearers tied to the deck supports. This meant that both the port and starboard side rear top deck walls had to be removed and rebuilt. New 150mm X 150mm hardwood  bearers were inserted as primary support for  the chain plates. The exterior was then covered with 2 layers of epoxy treated 19 mm marine ply. Continue reading “Chain Plates”